Non-narrative Prose

Short creative bursts.

Contents

       Newborn Oracle
       Old Occupational Manifesto
       Psychospheric mnemonic impression
       Dīxit Sūtra


Newborn Oracle

Baby poop.
To see baby poop.
I proclaim it as a new saying: “It is like seeing baby poop”.
That is to say, it is something about which one has no right to complain.
It is also something that one naturally will see and smell, especially when it comes to the first excretions.
Thence arises an art consisting in the reading and interpretation of feces on babies' diapers, similarly as with coffee grounds at the bottom of a cup.
Specialists in such matters, then, seek the precious and irreplaceable shits from the first one or two days after parturition.
An oracle is born.
Baby poop.


Old Occupational Manifesto

I get paid to talk.
I get paid to blabber. To flap lips.
Jaw-moving and lip-flapping is what I get paid for.
Jaw down, jaw up.
Lip flap, lip flap.
One language comes in, another language comes out, and vice versa.
Input-output.
I receive currency in exchange for uttering with tongue and larynx.
I acquire money by using a flow of air to produce sounds.
Input-output.
Language in, language out, and vice versa.
One code in, another code out.
I get paid to talk.
I am a talker.
I am The Interpreter.

Addendum

Jaw down, jaw up. RQS gets paid to talk.
A blabbering mechanism.
Code in, code out.
Open the mouth. Lower the mandible.
Talk.
Mandibular hinges.
Cylinder of air.
Such are RQS' tools.


Psychospheric mnemonic impression

Moss on rocks amid the aroma of conifers. The sound of a river flowing nearby. A refreshing mountain. The air cold enough to wear a coat; the sky clear enough to bask in the morning sun. The mist arrives late afternoon, announcing a retreat to the log cabin for coffee and chess. The nocturnal dance of the fireflies. Tropical altitude: a magnanimous combination of elevation and latitude. It never gets hot. I see my breadth when I exhale, except around noon. It never gets too cold, except when it's time to sleep.


Dīxit Sūtra

Dīxit: Classical Latin third person singular perfect indicative of the verb dīco, ‘to say’ (he/she/it said)

It said:
       —As far as they were concerned, they could have lived in orbital habitats (with windows and garden areas) where something like a nationality would already have been little more than an archaic, insufficient vestigial characteristic. As for linguistic variety and cultivation, that would have lived on, as it indeed has.

[...]

It said:
       —Let's apply optogenetics on Müller's brain and re-imagine Buddhist cosmology as a materialist mythology.

[...]

It replied:
       —But you see, Dharmakīrti, what you say assumes matter and consciousness have totally different natures. Do you ignore the electric correlates? And beyond perception, is there not a lepton stream furthering cognition? A first colour of sentience is amber.

[...]

It said:
       —In ancient times, states not only existed, but were the norm. Humans had lived in states for so long many had forgotten society could be organized another way. Among the least epistemized of them, some even believed civilization could not exist without the state.

[...]

It said:
       —Ah, but magical thinking was certainly not exclusive to the remotest of ancient times; not even to pre-epistemic epochs. At the advent of the space era, there still was a sufficiently high amount of people who believed they, as individuals, were all that mattered in reality, even for intended pragmatic purposes.
       Then it added:
       —Your ancestors pondered on how it was possible for their fellow humans to think thus. That, as they would find, was a question not so much for philosophy, but for psychology.

[...]

It declared:
       —Among the behavioural illnesses, cruelty is the most socially noxious of all. Pollution of the heart-mind; excess of neural chaos; malignant spiritual tumours. It is as detestable as it is useless.

[...]

It said:
       —The two sides of the disc of occurrence of unnecessary trouble: the awakened's warding responsibility and the brute's inherent toxicity. Both of them follow their nature.

[...]

It said:
       —The following is a magnanimous aphorism from remote antiquity: “To preserve the heart-mind and to purify it by letting impurities settle at the bottom in quiescence is the perverted dhyāna of silent illumination”.

[...]

It said:
       —Self-denial and pseudo-duty are part of the core of fakelife. When priorities are upside down, even incongruent suffering can be more important than actual reality.

[...]